Tar and Abby

Saturday, May 24, 2014

This cracked me up


When highly dyslexic youngest was caught in WA state's first version of this and being ground into the system we used to call our then Superintendent Dolores Umbridge (the super being a woman). 
Youngest was the first, and the last, class held to the tests. The accommodations offered to him were a total joke and I'm still steamed about it. So I instinctively distrust one size fits all standards. You've got to be ready for the Voldemorts out there...

7 comments:

Bob Slatten said...

When will people figure out that not all kids learn the same way?

mistress maddie said...

Dolores Umbridge? Yikes! And what were the accommodations like???

the dogs' mother said...

One thing dyslexics can not *hear* are subtle vowel sounds. Youngest was given a dictionary to look words up in. BUT you can't find a word if you are looking for the sound 'ta' and it is really 'tu'. Dictionaries don't work.
What I wanted was for him to do all his writing on a computer. It was/is his future. (He is a Computer Science major.) The computer can do a better job though he will still pick the first word offered and with hilarious results so an editor is a help.
His mind is wired differently and this is backed up by studies. When he reads his brain puts together different pathways for him to follow. It takes a dyslexic child five times the normal time to do a reading assignment.
Now - math, science, computer stuff he can do super sonic rings around his old teachers. Was a comfort to him when he was in school. The SPed teachers would set him to tutoring math students and he continued that into college.
I could go on and on.... ;-)
For him, and many others, there are many paths to reading and it is a life long issue. It takes time, creativity and super support.

Jeanne said...

I totally agree with you! Schools which teach in non-traditional ways, are condemned and yet the students thrive in those schools and those environments.

Katy Noelle said...

LOL!!!! And AMEN!!!! Lord have mercy on us!! :P sigh.

S'A said...

Had the same problem with my youngest-- not dyslexic, but he learned "differently" then the other students, so altho he's intelligent he had some teachers who didn't take the time to notice it--even when I went and talked to them. School was a torture for him-- and me. He graduated bottom of his class, but at least he graduated! It greatly affected his self confidence. Looking back, I wish I had home-schooled him.

Elizabeth Rose Stanton said...

Agreed. . .